Red Snakes in Arkansas

Arkansas is a state located in the southern region of the United States. It is known for its diverse geography, which includes the Ozark and Ouachita Mountains, forests, rivers, and bayous. The state is also home to a number of state and national parks, including Petit Jean State Park and Hot Springs National Park.

As for red snakes in Arkansas, there are several species of snakes in the state that could be considered “red,” including the scarlet kingsnake and the corn snake. The scarlet kingsnake is a nonvenomous snake that is native to the southeastern United States, including Arkansas. It gets its name from its bright red, orange, and yellow bands, which are similar to those of the venomous coral snake. The corn snake is another nonvenomous species that is found in Arkansas and is known for its reddish-orange coloration. Both of these snakes are relatively small, typically growing to be less than 4 feet in length.

We have top 10 listed Red Snakes in Arkansas.

    1. Copperhead Snake

    Copperheads are venomous snakes that are native to the eastern United States. They are a type of pit viper, which means they have a heat-sensing organ on their heads that they use to locate prey. Copperheads have a distinctive pattern of brown, reddish-brown, or copper-colored crossbands on their bodies. These snakes are typically about 2-3 feet long, but can grow up to 4 feet in length.

    Copperheads are found in a variety of habitats, including forests, fields, and rocky or wooded areas. In Arkansas, they are commonly found in the eastern and central parts of the state. Copperheads are active during the day and night and are often found near rocks or logs, where they can bask in the sun.

    Copperheads are opportunistic feeders, meaning they will eat whatever prey is available to them. Their diet consists mainly of small rodents, but they have also been known to eat lizards, frogs, and insects.

    To identify a copperhead, look for the distinctive cross band pattern on its body and the “pit” on the front of its head. Copperheads also have triangular-shaped heads and vertical pupils, which are common characteristics of pit vipers. It’s important to remember that copperheads are venomous and should be left alone if encountered in the wild. If you think you have come across a copperhead and are unsure, it is best to keep your distance and seek help from a professional.

    2. Coral Snake

    Coral snakes are venomous snakes that are native to the southeastern United States. They are members of the Elapidae family, which also includes cobras, mambas, and sea snakes.

    Basic info:

    • Scientific name: Micrurus fulvius
    • Size: average length is 2-3 feet
    • Lifespan: unknown, but likely around 10 years

    Appearance: Coral snakes are small, slender snakes with brightly colored bands of red, yellow, and black. They have a small head and narrow neck, and their eyes are small and fixed in size. Their scales are smooth and glossy, and they have a pointed tail.

    How to identify: Coral snakes can be difficult to identify because they resemble several other species of nonvenomous snakes. However, there are a few key ways to tell them apart:

    • The red and yellow bands are always adjacent to each other on a coral snake, while on nonvenomous species, the red and yellow bands are separated by black bands.
    • Coral snakes have a black snout, while nonvenomous species have a white or light-colored snout.
    • Coral snakes have fixed, round pupils, while nonvenomous species have vertically slit pupils.

    Food or Diet: Coral snakes feed on small rodents and other small animals, such as lizards and other snakes. They use their venom to paralyze their prey before consuming it.

    Habits: Coral snakes are generally shy and reclusive, and they spend most of their time underground in burrows or under debris. They are most active at night, and they are primarily found in forested areas and grasslands.

    Range in Arkansas: Coral snakes are found in the southeastern United States, including parts of Arkansas. They are most commonly found in the eastern and southern parts of the state.

    3. Hognose Snake

    Hognose snakes (Heterodon spp.) are a small species of colubrid snake that are native to North and Central America. They are known for their distinctive upturned nose, which is used for digging in sandy soil. Hognose snakes are nonvenomous and generally not aggressive towards humans, although they may hiss and puff up their bodies to appear larger when threatened.

    In terms of appearance, hognose snakes are relatively small, with adults reaching an average length of 30-50 cm. They have a heavy, thick body and a distinct upturned nose. The color and pattern of hognose snakes can vary widely, but they are generally tan, brown, or gray with dark spots or blotches. Some species may also have brightly colored underbellies.

    To identify a hognose snake, look for the following characteristics:

    • Upturned nose
    • Heavy, thick body
    • Colored underbelly (in some species)
    • Dark spots or blotches on the body

    Hognose snakes primarily feed on amphibians, such as frogs and toads, but they will also eat small rodents and lizards. In the wild, they are opportunistic feeders and will eat whatever prey is most readily available.

    Hognose snakes are generally nocturnal, spending most of the day hiding in burrows or other underground retreats. They are active during the cooler hours of the night, when they hunt for food.

    In Arkansas, hognose snakes can be found in a variety of habitats, including grasslands, forests, and wetlands. They are widely distributed throughout the state and are considered common.

    4. Pygmy Rattlesnake

    The pygmy rattlesnake (Sistrurus miliarius) is a small species of venomous snake native to North America. It is a member of the pit viper family and is known for the distinctive rattle on the end of its tail, which it uses to warn predators of its presence.

    Appearance: Pygmy rattlesnakes are typically small, with adults reaching an average length of 18-30 inches. They have a triangular shaped head and thin body, and are typically brown or gray in color with dark bands or blotches.

    How to identify: In addition to the rattle on the end of its tail, the pygmy rattlesnake can be identified by its small size and thin body. It also has heat-sensing pits on its head, which it uses to locate prey.

    Food or Diet: Pygmy rattlesnakes feed on small mammals, such as mice and rats, as well as lizards and birds.

    Habits: Pygmy rattlesnakes are typically found in a variety of habitats, including forests, fields, and wetlands. They are most active at dawn and dusk and spend much of their time hiding under debris or in burrows.

    Range in Arkansas: Pygmy rattlesnakes are found in a number of states in the southeastern and central United States, including Arkansas. They are most commonly found in the southern and western parts of the state.

    It is important to note that pygmy rattlesnakes, like all venomous snakes, should be treated with caution and respect. If you encounter one in the wild, it is best to keep your distance and avoid disturbing it. If you are bitten by a pygmy rattlesnake, seek medical attention immediately.

    5. Garter Snake

    Garter snakes are small to medium-sized snakes that are found throughout much of North America. They are named for the stripes that run lengthwise down their bodies, which are reminiscent of the garters that were once worn to hold up men’s socks.

    Garter snakes can be identified by their long, slender bodies and triangular heads. They are typically between 18 and 53 inches long, and they can vary in color from shades of green, brown, and black to more brightly colored patterns of red, yellow, and blue.

    Garter snakes are generally harmless to humans and are not aggressive. They are found in a variety of habitats, including forests, fields, and gardens, and they are often attracted to areas near water. Garter snakes are active during the day and are typically most active in the morning and evening.

    Garter snakes are carnivorous and feed on a variety of small prey, including worms, slugs, and insects. They are also known to eat small rodents, such as mice and voles, and occasionally frogs and salamanders.

    In Arkansas, garter snakes are found throughout the state and are common in a variety of habitats, including wooded areas, fields, and gardens. They are active during the warmer months of the year and typically mate and give birth to live young in the late spring and early summer.

    6. Ring-Necked Snake

    The Ring-necked Snake is a small, slender snake that is found throughout much of the United States. It is also known as the Ring-necked Snake, the Ringneck Snake, or the Ring-billed Snake.

    In terms of appearance, the Ring-necked Snake has a smooth, shiny scales and a slender body. It is typically between 10 and 15 inches in length, and is usually a shades of black, brown, or gray. The most distinguishing feature of this snake is the yellow or orange ring around its neck, which gives it its common name.

    To identify a Ring-necked Snake, look for the yellow or orange ring around its neck. You may also be able to identify it by its slender body and smooth, shiny scales.

    The diet of a Ring-necked Snake consists mainly of small insects and other invertebrates. They may also occasionally feed on small frogs or lizards.

    In terms of habits, the Ring-necked Snake is a primarily nocturnal species, and is most active at night. They are often found in a variety of habitats, including forests, fields, and gardens. They are also often found near water, as they are good swimmers.

    In Arkansas, the Ring-necked Snake can be found throughout much of the state. It is a common species in the region, and can be found in a variety of habitats.

    7. Western Ground Snake

    Western ground snakes (Sonora semiannulata) are small, non-venomous snakes that are native to the southwestern United States and parts of Mexico. They are often found in arid or semi-arid habitats, such as deserts, grasslands, and scrublands.

    In terms of appearance, western ground snakes are slender and elongated, with a thin, pointed head and small eyes. They have smooth scales and a shiny, iridescent coloration that can vary from pale tan to pinkish-brown or reddish-brown. They have a distinctive pattern of dark crossbands on their backs, which are usually more prominent in juveniles. Western ground snakes can grow up to 20 inches in length, but most individuals are much smaller, averaging around 8-12 inches.

    To identify a western ground snake, you should look for the following characteristics:

    • Small size: Western ground snakes are one of the smallest snake species in their range, so they are often mistaken for worms or other small invertebrates.
    • Slender, elongated body: Western ground snakes have a thin, streamlined appearance, with a long, slender tail.
    • Shiny, iridescent coloration: Western ground snakes have a shiny, metallic sheen to their skin, which can range in color from pale tan to reddish-brown.
    • Distinctive crossband pattern: Western ground snakes have dark crossbands on their backs, which are usually more prominent in juveniles.

    In terms of diet, western ground snakes are insectivorous, meaning that they primarily feed on insects and other small invertebrates. They are active foragers and will hunt for their prey in the leaf litter, soil, and other debris on the ground.

    Western ground snakes are generally shy and non-aggressive, and they will usually try to escape if confronted by a potential predator. They are active during the day and spend most of their time hiding or foraging on the ground.

    In terms of distribution, western ground snakes are found in the southwestern United States, including parts of California, Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas. They are also found in parts of Mexico. In Arkansas, western ground snakes are not native and are not known to occur.

    8. Carphophis Vermis

    Carphophis vermis is a species of small, nonvenomous snake that is native to the eastern United States. It is commonly known as the worm snake or the eastern worm snake.

    In terms of appearance, Carphophis vermis is a small snake with a slender, worm-like body. It typically grows to be around 8-12 inches in length and has smooth, shiny scales. The snake is usually brown or reddish-brown in color with a pale or yellowish underside.

    One of the best ways to identify Carphophis vermis is by its small size and worm-like appearance. It is also important to note that this species of snake is nonvenomous and does not have fangs.

    The diet of Carphophis vermis consists mainly of worms and other small invertebrates.

    In terms of habitat, Carphophis vermis is found in a variety of environments, including forests, fields, and gardens. It is commonly found in the eastern United States, including the state of Arkansas.

    In terms of habits, Carphophis vermis is a burrowing snake that spends much of its time underground. It is nocturnal, meaning that it is active at night and sleeps during the day. When threatened, the snake will usually try to escape by burrowing into the ground or hiding in leaf litter.

    9. Western Mud Snake

    The Western Mud Snake (Farancia abacura) is a nonvenomous snake species that is native to the southeastern United States. It is a member of the family Colubridae, which includes many common species of harmless snakes.

    In terms of appearance, the Western Mud Snake is a long and slender snake with a glossy, black or dark brown body. It has a pink or reddish belly and can grow to be up to 4 feet in length. The snake is easily distinguishable by its bright red or orange coloration on the underside of its tail, which is used to lure prey.

    To identify a Western Mud Snake, look for the following characteristics:

    • Long and slender body
    • Glossy, black or dark brown body
    • Pink or reddish belly
    • Bright red or orange coloration on the underside of the tail

    The Western Mud Snake is primarily aquatic and can be found in a variety of wetland habitats, including swamps, marshes, and bayous. It feeds mainly on small fish, frogs, and other aquatic prey.

    In terms of habits, the Western Mud Snake is primarily nocturnal and is most active at night. It is not aggressive and will typically try to escape if confronted by a human.

    The Western Mud Snake is found in a number of states in the southeastern United States, including Arkansas. It is not considered to be threatened or endangered.

    10. Slowinski’s Corn Snake

    Slowinski’s corn snakes (Pantherophis slowinskii) are a subspecies of corn snake found in parts of the southern United States, including Arkansas. They are nonvenomous and are popular pets due to their docile nature and easy care.

    Appearance: Slowinski’s corn snakes are small to medium-sized snakes, reaching an average adult size of 3-5 feet in length. They have a slender, streamlined body with smooth scales. Their coloration is variable, but they are typically shades of red, orange, or yellow, with black and white markings. The characteristic “corn” pattern consists of a series of black and white bands encircling the body, with a solid white underside.

    How to identify: Slowinski’s corn snakes can be distinguished from other corn snake subspecies by the presence of a white line running down the center of the black bands on their body. They also have a distinctive white stripe running from the corner of the eye to the corner of the mouth.

    Food or Diet: Slowinski’s corn snakes are carnivorous and feed primarily on rodents in the wild. In captivity, they can be fed a diet of frozen-thawed mice or rats, which should be offered to them every 7-10 days. It is important to provide a dish of clean water for your corn snake to drink from at all times.

    Habits: Slowinski’s corn snakes are generally docile and make good pets. They are active during the day and will often bask in the sun to regulate their body temperature. They are also good climbers and may try to escape if given the opportunity. It is important to provide a secure enclosure with a secure lid to prevent escapes.

    Range in Arkansas: Slowinski’s corn snakes are found in the southern parts of the United States, including Arkansas. They can be found in a variety of habitats, including woodlands, fields, and farms. They are primarily found in the southeastern and central parts of the state.

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